Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to erupt in your mouth and are the teeth least needed for good oral health. Most people have four wisdom teeth that usually erupt through the gums in their late teens or early twenties.

Sometimes wisdom teeth remain trapped in the jawbone under the gums because there is insufficient room for them to erupt.

Wisdom teeth can cause gum disease, crowding or other damage to adjacent teeth, decay (due to the inability of your toothbrush to keep the area clean), and bone destroying cysts. Pain and swelling are the most common symptoms of problem wisdom teeth.

Whether you have obvious symptoms or not, it is important to diagnose existing or potential problems caused by your wisdom teeth. Removal is often the wisest decision for your health and well-being.

Wisdom Teeth FAQ

Some symptoms of wisdom teeth are a pain in the jaw, tenderness, swelling around the gums, discharge if an abscess or infection is present, or you can see it poking through the gum behind your second molar. Some people, however, don’t have any visible or noticeable symptoms of wisdom teeth pain.

Wisdom teeth, if not grown properly, can cause further dental problems, including damage to surrounding teeth, jaw damage (cyst growth), inflamed/infected gum tissues, cavities, alignment problems, or sinus issues.

We recommend waiting three-four days following wisdom teeth removal to exercise or participate in any vigorous activity. Exercising too early could aggravate the blood clot and increase your recovery time as well as discomfort.